Natasha Moore

Tash graduated with a First Class Masters Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Bristol in 2020. During this degree Tash studied a range of subjects including; design and manufacture, materials engineering, thermofluids and systems and control. She also  undertook more extensive research projects for her bachelors and masters level dissertation projects, as well as an additional ESPRC funded summer research internship. These included using Finite Element Analysis to investigate the interaction of cracks in Auxetic materials, writing numerical solvers for partial differential equations using radial basis functions and using computational fluid dynamics to model the flow through a structure in the kidney. Following her degree Tash joined L3 Harris as a graduate engineer in their marine department, which worked on providing software systems for Naval Ships. As part of the graduate scheme Tash moved around different areas of the company including; software engineering, control and instrumentation, systems engineering and IT support, mainly working on projects related to the Type 26 Frigate. Tash is joining the Bristol Office as an Associate.

Philippa Moore

Philippa graduated from the University of Cambridge with MA and MSci degrees in materials science and metallurgy. She subsequently stayed at Cambridge to gain her PhD, researching the microstructures and properties of laser and laser/arc hybrid welds in pipeline steels, a project supported by industrial partner, TWI Ltd. Philippa then spent 18 years working at TWI Ltd, and developed an international reputation in fracture toughness testing, and engineering failure investigation, often of welded steel structures, through her project work and consultancy. In her last six years at TWI she was a Team Manager, her roles included responsibility for a team of engineers who delivered fracture toughness testing services for TWI. She has also carried out projects related to fracture tests in corrosive environments and hydrogen embrittlement of steels. She has published over 45 conference and journal papers on her academic research, and on topics supporting her involvement on British and International standards committees for fracture testing. Philippa was herself the industrial supervisor of five PhD students and four MSc students from 2013 to 2019 working on fracture-related topics. An inspirational and respected technical expert, she is an enthusiastic and experienced presenter to both technical and non-specialist audiences on topics related […]

Giuseppe Scatigno

Giuseppe graduated with a 1st Class Master’s Degree in Materials Science and Nuclear Engineering from Imperial College London. During this period, he worked at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the Incident and Emergency Centre, performing radiological dose calculations, following the Fukushima nuclear disaster. He completed a PhD, researching electrochemistry and corrosion, where he focused on environment-assisted corrosion phenomena, working closely with several nuclear utilities across the world. Giuseppe also spent time in Japan working on the development of Gen III+ reactors at Hitachi-GE Ltd. Giuseppe’s PhD work required the extensive use of state-of-the-art microscopy techniques, experimental traditional techniques, as well as computational, mathematical, and analytical methods. After completing his PhD, Giuseppe worked as a Research Associate for Imperial College, sponsored by EDF Energy, to study stress corrosion cracking resistance of dry cask storage units designed to be used for the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel. Giuseppe was then employed by EDF Energy, where he worked as a Corrosion Engineer and Chemist. Giuseppe worked closely with power generating stations before becoming the lead on water cooling systems and interim spent fuel storage. Giuseppe defined the chemical inhibitors regimes and corrosion monitoring systems to ensure the appropriate management of […]

Gerald Deshais

Gerald completed his PhD in Materials Science at the University of Cambridge in 1999, where he investigated the resistance of 7XXX alloys to stress corrosion cracking on behalf of Péchiney (now part of Rio Tinto Alcan). Using transmission electronic microscopy and spectroscopy, he characterised the effects of grain boundary chemistry on crack propagation and compared it with fracture mechanics models. In 1999, Gerald’s interest in the aerospace industry led him to join Rolls-Royce Materials’ Department, working on the advancement of testing and analytical methods to predict low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue failure in titanium compressor blades. He then went on to co-ordinate a research project on the subject with 12 European partners, funded by the European Commission. From 2002, he became involved with the design of increasingly complex aero-engine systems for Airbus and Boeing airframes. Firstly, by project managing the certification of control systems, then by leading the development of innovative transmissions and gas turbine structures. In 2011, upon joining GE Aviation Systems, Gerald expanded his expertise into the design of novel composite wing structures for the Airbus A350-XWB aircraft. Reflecting on the importance of processes and systems engineering in the development of safety critical products, he took on a 6-sigma […]