Plant Pathology

At Hawkins plant pathology encompasses agricultural, horticultural, forestry, marine and contamination claims. Our experts are experienced in investigating the causes of plant diseases, crop failures and spoilage of fresh produce and agricultural cargoes.

Plant pathology is the study of any factors that cause a plant to express symptoms that are abnormal for the plant in the environment in which it is growing.  These symptoms could be leaf spots, tissue discolouration, blight, wilting, stunting, dieback, cankers, tumours, abnormal growth, deformed plant parts or combinations of the above.

During transport and storage post-harvest rots, moulds, breakdown, contamination and collapse of grains, fresh produce, dry produce and plant products can also occur rendering the shipment unmarketable.

The causal factors of symptoms can be biotic (other living organisms) or abiotic (non-living things).

Plant genetics or physiology can also cause unusual symptoms in plants.

WHY APPOINT A FORENSIC INVESTIGATOR?

Hawkins can provide an expert who is familiar with a range of different symptoms and can offer answers to your questions.

Examples of Typical cases

If you would like to know if we can help, please fill out our enquiry form or give us a call for a free consultation.  Below are a few examples of cases but our expertise is not limited to these areas, so please contact us if you think we could help.

HOW DOES HAWKINS INVESTIGATE PLANT PATHOLOGY CASES?

1

Consultation

We like to speak to you before we conduct any work, to establish if we can add any value to the case. These discussions help us to understand your requirements, as well as determining how much information is already available, including for example, the affected crop or cargo, data records, first-hand witness accounts, photographs, and videos. We are also happy to provide you with an estimate of the cost of conducting a forensic investigation.

2

Inspection

If required and with your agreement, we will arrange to visit the scene to inspect the site. Wherever possible, we will take samples of the affected plant material, fruit, vegetables or grain for microscopic examination and laboratory analysis, where a range of equipment and tests are used to determine the cause of the problem.

3

Conclusion

Once our examination and tests are complete, we will discuss our findings with you and prepare a report containing a detailed account of our investigation, conclusions, and where appropriate, further work or advice.

Related areas of expertise

Contamination & Pollution

Fires, explosions, floods, water and chemical leaks, building collapses and other calamities can give rise to issues of contamination. It is not uncommon for machinery, building structures, stock etc. to become contaminated outside of the obvious areas where items are burnt, submerged, crushed or otherwise directly damaged during the incident.

Cargo Spoilage

Many agricultural cargoes such as maize (corn), wheat, soybeans and seedcake are shipped in bulk. Such cargoes have a limited safe storage period before their quality deteriorates. The subject of storage of agricultural cargoes is a complex one with many variables to consider.

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